Monday, March 31, 2014
karamazove:

 Alma Stanley, theater actress, New York

karamazove:

 Alma Stanley, theater actress, New York

chauvinistsushi:

donrickles:

Richard Pryor’s television debut.

whaat he’s so tiny

Sunday, March 16, 2014
For five months people in the courtroom watched the unlovely spectacle of three female defense attorneys trying to make the slain mother of their clients killable to the juries. The dead woman was attacked in a rampage of verbal violence that equaled and occasionally surpassed in gore the contact wound made when Lyle Menendez fired into her cheek after Erik had helped him reload his spent weapon, the shot that turned Kitty Menendez’s face into near nothingness. Kitty’s body was found on the floor of the family room, next to her dead husband’s feet. Her face lay in her own coagulating blood. One of her eyes was shot out and her nose was gone. Her teeth had been knocked out of her mouth by the impact of the contact blast, except for the one that hung loose from the top gum, like a hag’s. Her hair stood straight up, like Don King’s, from the impact of the final blast. Her left breast, which had presumably once suckled her sons, was a mass of ugly pellet wounds. The fingers of one of her hands, with their freshly manicured pink nails, were intertwined with her own guts and matter.

Dominick Dunne, "Menendez Justice"

Dominick Dunne’s Vanity Fair trial coverage is maybe a little too prominent a part of my life and research right now.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

thefabricpress:

The Dying Swan (Marie Epstein & Jean Benoit-Lévy, 1937)

(Source: coeursfideles)

finalgirldom:

Reconciling the fact that just a century ago most 21-year-old American men would almost positively already be in possession of a family of 5 and/or be fighting in a World War and/or doing some sort of grueling labor with the reality of today in which the closest most 21-year-old American men will get to any of that is re-blogging a daguerreotype of one of those realities is always a little existentially challenging.

finalgirldom:

Reconciling the fact that just a century ago most 21-year-old American men would almost positively already be in possession of a family of 5 and/or be fighting in a World War and/or doing some sort of grueling labor with the reality of today in which the closest most 21-year-old American men will get to any of that is re-blogging a daguerreotype of one of those realities is always a little existentially challenging.

FACT: Julianne Moore has never won an Oscar.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014
rhizomatous:

Coyote riding public rail in Portland, OR (via)

Never forget.

rhizomatous:

Coyote riding public rail in Portland, OR (via)

Never forget.

Monday, February 24, 2014 Sunday, February 2, 2014

Only a master could avoid being upstaged by Jeff Bridges. So much worth missing today.

Friday, January 31, 2014

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966)

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966)

(Source: samuraial)

Friday, January 24, 2014

(Source: murderer-poet)

The Price of Ratings Gold

believermag:

image

In the Believer's January issue, Sarah Marshall delved deep into the story of Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding in the 1994 Olympics with an eye on femininity, celebrity, and the prevailing media narrative of the time. This week we asked her to share her thoughts on ESPN’s latest 30 for 30 documentary, The Price of Gold (now streaming on Netflix) which revisits the same characters and issues.

Are you ready for the Olympics?

The Sochi Games start in two weeks, and if you think you can escape them, you should probably give up that charade right now. Even if you can stay away from Twitter and Facebook and all other social media for sixteen days, even if you can avoid chatty coworkers and emails from friends, even if you can convince yourself that you just don’t care about even the smallest aspect of the Olympics—not the now-inevitable doping controversies, not the ceremonial flourishes and flubs, not the artistic pinnacles reached by the great minds behind the hours’ worth of commercials for Visa and Nike and McDonald’s and Coke—the Olympics will find you. And if you can resist everything else, they will still use their greatest weapon to bring you into the fold: narrative.

Is there any venue that produces more narrative than the Olympic games? Forget all the various writing festivals and conferences that take up the bulk of the calendar year; forget all the graduates of all the MFA programs in the country; forget even the publishing houses. If you want a story, or better yet want to find out what story is, you’ll get a far greater education by spending the night watching the Olympics than you would after a weekend in the library stacks. When it comes to narrative, the Games have it all: the poised young prodigy living her most outrageous dreams; the athlete returning for a second Olympics, determined to prove himself after tragedy, injury, or past failure; and, of course, the rivalry.

Read More

If you were wondering what I thought of ESPN’s “The Price of Gold”—and were thinking “I really liked Sarah’s piece in the Believer, but wish it talked more about Sondheim”—you’re in luck!

Monday, January 13, 2014
missmonroes:

Marilyn Monroe at the Golden Globes, 1962

missmonroes:

Marilyn Monroe at the Golden Globes, 1962